Are the Kids Alright?

For years and years now, every national poll of students done by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) or any other government drug agency for that matter, has told us their optimistic bull$#!t pitch that they have discovered – contrary to what we all know from our own neighborhoods, schools, and families – that drug use is actually down amongst young people.  Yay.  For those of you who have never heard of NIDA, it is a research institute, funded by the federal government, whose mission is to “lead the Nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction.”  These government bureaucrats want us to distrust our lying hearts and eyes.  The death and destruction that drugs (mostly prescription nowadays) are doing to young people at this point in history is nothing to worry about, says the government.  What liars they are.  How do they sleep at night?

These studies have two fatal flaws:  (1) They want us all to assume that young people tell the truth about their using, and (2) that they, the government, are to be trusted to tell the public the truth.  NIDA was an outstanding organization.  It is run by Nora Volkow, who I thought was one of the smartest people about addiction in the country.  But I noticed a few years ago that she herself has drank the harm-reduction kool-aid brought to you by the Big Pharmacy corporations who want us all in line at Walgreen’s, feeling biologically inadequate and incapable of living a healthy happy productive lives without taking three or four of their very expensive drugs at any given moment.  This is a tsunami of death.  Drugs and young people.

If you are 18 years old right now, you are more likely to die of drugs than of a car accident or cancer or terrorist attack. Yet the government releases report after report about how young people are turning away from drugs.  Bull$#!t.  If you don’t believe me, go on NIDA for teens and read these lies for yourself.  Something is up here, people.  I don’t know how the funding for NIDA flows.  But my suspicion is that its job is to report on all the good news from the government’s great works. This gets NIDA a bigger budget next year.  I’m just sayin!

Love n peace to all,
Bob

Bob Forrest

Bob Forrest

Program Director at Alo House
The longtime partner of Dr. Drew Pinsky, Bob has helped countless alcoholics and addicts get sober and find their purpose. Bob Forrest is considered to be one of the finest drug counsellors living today, assisting everyone from award winning celebrities to struggling teens. His success in connecting with clients and their loved ones can directly be attributed to his knack for communicating from an honest place of understanding and compassion.

An addict himself, and a former resident at multiple rehabilitation centers, Bob Forrest knows that while safety, containment and repetition help, they aren’t the keys to recovery. In 1996 when he got clean, Bob started developing an innovative and individualized structure for the treatment of addiction.

Bob helps our clients come to a place where they feel they are really, finally accepting personal responsibility for their own recovery. By being in a less restrictive living situation — a positive, supportive living environment, in which they have to really want sobriety — clients become willing to do whatever is necessary to achieve and maintain their recovery. In this sort of an atmosphere, they aren’t just sitting around, but living free with their peers in a supportive, low-pressure, non-judgmental, hands-on recovery setting, a real home, in which they can actively participate in their own individual journeys into sobriety.

“I want to treat addicts with dignity, love and compassion. I’m going to be honest with them. I’m not going to be mad at them if they don’t like what I’m trying to help them accomplish. If they fail or stumble or are defiant, I’m not going to get into arguments with them. I just want to love, help, encourage, nurture and steer people in a more positive direction of life.”
Bob Forrest

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